Radios

Connect On Social

Search

Learn More

 

Soldier’s Network Radios

 

 

Putting the power of the network in the hands of soldiers on the ground for the first time ever, General Dynamics Mission Systems’ Manpack and Rifleman radios extend voice and data communications to the tactical edge.

Working together to form ad-hoc networks without fixed infrastructure, and connected to the WIN-T network and Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) satellite system, Rifleman and Manpack enable apps and data service for individual soldiers like never before.

Both radios have met all of the Army’s operational capabilities and military requirements and have successfully undergone extensive government testing.

 

 

Manpack Radio

THE FIRST APPROVED TWO-CHANNEL MANPACK RADIO CONNECTING SOLDIERS TO MUOS

 

“THE MANPACK WILL ENHANCE CURRENT COMMUNICATIONS CAPABILITIES WITHOUT HAVING TO RELY ON A FIXED INFRASTRUCTURE.”

 

 

A soldier uses a Manpack radio to communicate at the Army’s Network Integration Evaluation 13.1 (Photo Courtesy of U.S. Army)

The PRC-155 Manpack Radio is the first two-channel voice and data radio to connect both soldiers on the ground and vehicles downrange to the “big Army” network.

The PRC- 155 Manpack is the first and only fielded, two-channel tactical radio that connects the new Mobile User Objective Satellite (MUOS) network, while also bridging lower tactical tier networks to the “big Army” network that reaches back anywhere in the world.

Both the Manpack and Rifleman Radios include GPS for position-location applications – painting individual units on a map to help reduce fratricide and increase situational awareness on the battlefield.

Click here to view the PRC-155 Manpack Radio Product Page.

 

 

 

 

 

MUOS: Mobile User Objective System

Next-Generation Satellite Communications.

 

 

The Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) is the U.S. Navy’s next-generation satellite communications system providing simultaneous voice, video and data communications for U.S. forces anytime and anywhere in the world. Other Soldier’s Network systems, including WIN-T and the Manpack radio, are able to connect to the MUOS satellite system so that soldiers can communicate anywhere in the world.

General Dynamics Mission Systems leads the development and deployment of the MUOS communication waveform and ground system, which includes four ground station facilities positioned around the globe to assist in the management and operation of the orbiting satellites.

Each ground station is equipped with three freestanding antennas, which act like cell phone switches, receiving radio calls relayed through the MUOS satellites. The system provides a familiar cellular phone-like service, allowing forces on the ground to communicate directly with each other and their commanders regardless of location.

 

 

General Dynamics Mission Systems mounted three 18.4-meter satellite antennas on 53-foot-tall pedestals in Wahiawa, Hawaii, as part of the preparations to deploy the new Mobile User Objective System (MUOS), the U.S. military’s next-generation narrowband global mobile satellite communications system.

 

 

 

Our 2 Ch. Manpack radio is the first and only tactical radio to deliver secure voice and data connectivity with the MUOS system in polar regions

MUOS radio calls, like those recently demonstrated in the Arctic Circle with the PRC-155 Manpack radio, use the MUOS waveform. Developed by General Dynamics’ engineers in Scottsdale, AZ, the waveform converts a commercial third generation (3G) Wideband Code Division Multiple Access (WCDMA) cellular phone technology to provide a new and more capable UHF military satellite communications (SATCOM) system.

Click here to learn more about the Mobile User Objective System (MUOS)

 

 

Rifleman Radio

RIFLEMAN EXTENDS THE NETWORK DOWN TO THE INDIVIDUAL SOLDIER LIKE NO RADIO EVER BEFORE.

VOICE. DATA. APPS. POSITION LOCATION ON A MAP.

 

 

The PRC-154 Rifleman Radio extends the network and new capabilities to individual soldiers like never before. With Rifleman’s voice service and embedded GPS for position location information, individual soldiers can keep touch with the entire platoon and have their position known by other soldiers connected to the network.

Acting as a “network tower,” Rifleman bridges voice and data between each individual radio to extend the network and ensure signal around obstructions, keeping dispersed soldiers in constant contact.

Rifleman can also be used with commercial smartphone and tablet devices. The Rifleman acts the way a cell tower would, giving soldiers the ability to view maps and position location of other soldiers in the unit, text, take pictures and video with the end-user device and send it to the rest the platoon through the radio.

Click here to view the PRC-154A Rifleman Radio Product Page

Soldier from the 4th Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division uses Rifleman Radio in Afghanistan (Photo Courtesy of the U.S. Army)

 

 

 

Nett Warrior

Smartphones for soldiers, enabled by the rifleman radio

 

OVERVIEW OF THE U.S. ARMY’S NEW BATTLEFIELD SMARTPHONE. (VIDEO COURTESY OF U.S. ARMY)

The Nett Warrior program connects Rifleman team-leader radios to off-the-shelf smartphones through a tether, allowing the soldier to use his or her Rifleman radio as a type of cell tower that connects the user device to the Soldier’s Network.

This enables individual soldiers on the ground to use applications and transmit voice, data, video and pictures through the Soldier’s Network.

“HMS radios will network small units with individual Soldiers, providing game-changing information at the lowest echelons.”